3.3 Ground-Nesting Birds Recovery Project

This project aims to raise awareness of the plight of curlew, lapwing and snipe, and develop a Scheme wide monitoring of populations and active breeding protection measures.

Urgent action aiming to stop and then reverse the decline of curlew, lapwing and snipe, particularly the iconic curlew, to prevent their local extinction, working with the other wildlife projects by:

  • Surveys, mapping and research to find the birds’ nesting sites and foraging areas and causes of decline
  • Increasing and improving breeding and foraging areas, by advice, training, small grants and demonstration projects
  • Walks, talks and events to celebrate and increase knowledge of the birds

Opportunities for:

  • Practical steps to protect the birds by learning and recording
  • Landowners protecting existing sites and creating new ones to help conserve the birds
  • Promoting and taking part in events to get good information more widely known
  • Learning small changes in farming practice to make a big difference to birds survival

For more information and to get involved please contact Amanda Perkins.


Curlew breed in grassland and migrate to the coast in winter. Numbers locally have decreased by over 30% in the last 11 years. Follow link to download advice sheet for farmers, land managers and contracts, to help protect curlew. http://www.stiperstonesandcorndon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Curlew-leaflet-IMPRINT-final.pdf

Curlw nest monitoring reports, CurlewCam footage and lots more information on http://curlewcountry.org/

 

 

 

 

Snipe by Jim Almond

 

Snipe breed locally on wet ground.  They are exceptionally rare and most of the snipe seen locally are winter visitors that have migrated south.  Follow link to download advice sheet for farmers, land managers and contracts, to help protect snipe.  http://www.stiperstonesandcorndon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Snipe-leaflet-IMPRINT-final.pdf

 

 

 

Lapwing by Jim Almond

Lapwing by Jim Almond

 

Lapwing over-winter here in warmer winters, but most migrate to winter feeding grounds.  Some winter birds migrate in and the number of local breeding birds have dwindled dramatically.  Follow link to download advice sheet for farmers, land managers and contracts, to help protect lapwing.  http://www.stiperstonesandcorndon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Lapwing-leaflet-IMPRINT-final.pdf